In September, The Washington Post presented an article in a shocked tone that the FDA does not require a label of genetically modified food (salmon). In this article, the problem was that the public has the right to know whether or not a particular food, in this case salmon, is organically or inorganically processed. The reporter covers this issue by presenting direct quotes from a a democratic representative, a professor, a director at the Biotechnology Industry Organization, and receiving resources and interviewing the FDA. This article can be foundĀ HERE.

The Los Angeles Times covers this topic written by Andrew Zajac in his article, “No agreement imminent on salmon labeling.” He addresses the concern that the public may not know which is genetically modified salmon versus the natural Atlantic salmon. The writer criticizes and makes the public know that the FDA wont require a certain label in order to distinguish the two type of fish. Under FDA rules, they’re not obligated to do so unless there is a significant difference in appearance or in the nutrient values. In which, the FDA in the briefing packet did state that the consumers cannot distinguish the difference between the GE salmon with Atlantic salmon. The writer also refers to a similar incident with labeling issue back in 1990s about milk. Overall, the writer addresses his concern for the public of not knowing what is real and genetically modified salmon in which it makes the readers scared and nervous of what they might be eating.

The issue was also covered in The New York Times, written by Paul Voosen called, “Panel Advises More Aggressive FDA Analysis of Engineered Salmon.” This article covers the entire process in which the FDA is trying to achieve in order to approve the application of GE salmon. The writer has direct quotes and informations from several professors specializing in the biological, environmental aspects and AquaBounty. Overall, the article warns the FDA to take precaution in the approval process and to thoroughly investigate the issue.

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